Sleep

popcorn-flower

Sleep is good, but when, how, where, how much?

Matthew Wolf-Meyer has a new book, an ethnography of sleep, The Slumbering Masses: Sleep, Medicine, and Modern American Life, that is amazing to read.

The favorite bit of wisdom I heard about sleep types was that some people are popcorn and others are flowers. Popcorn people POP! awake in the morning (often unbelievably early) and are sometimes already talking by the time their eyes are open. Their bodyminds are ready to work, think, write and they often go to it. As the day develops into the evening they slow down a bit, take things leisurely, and into the night many of them wilt (like popcorn in water) and tired slurred speech appears as they drift into bed.

Flower people are the opposite. Mornings see them embracing their pillows, dreams extend past their alarms, they ever so slowly open to the new day, like flowers; some of us are barely coherent until almost noon. As the day develops they get more and more awake, preferring to teach in the afternoon or even evening, and night is when they are actually, finally sharp, ready to talk fast, read deeply, write fluently. My most productive hours are 11pm to 4am. Skypeing then with European popcorns is a meeting of amazing intensity. I pop asleep too, transitioning from full alertness to out cold with almost no trace of tiredness. I save that for morning.

There are many other forms of chronotypes, and this nice article by Maria Popova is worth perusing when you’re up for it.

 

(there’s a bunch of other things i want to say but not now)

»Fascia Movement Research Lab (Dumit & O’Connor)

myofascialbag

STS.175 Laboratory Studies Lab (Special Fall 2015 Course, limited to 19 students) Fascia Movement Research Lab (led by Prof. Joseph Dumit & Kevin O’Connor) Science & Technology Studies (STS) is the study of how science, technology, and medicine change. Laboratory studies involves participant observation in research labs to understand how facts are negotiated, crafted, and Continue reading…

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»Objective Brains, Prejudicial Images

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Science in Context 12, 1 (1999), pp.173-201 In this article I argue that brain images constructed with computerized tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are part of a category of “expert images” and are both visually persuasive and also particularly difficult to interpret and understand by non-experts. Following the innovative judicial analogy of “demonstrative Continue reading…

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»Cyborg Babies

CyborgBabies

From Techno-sex to Techno-tots Edited by Robbie Davis-Floyd and Joseph Dumit (Routledge, Aug 1998) From fetuses scanned ultrasonically to computer hackers in daycare, contemporary children are increasingly rendered cyborg by their immersion in technoculture. As we are faced with reproductive choices connected directly with technologies, we often have trouble gaining perspective on our own cultural Continue reading…

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