Sleep

popcorn-flower

Sleep is good, but when, how, where, how much?

Matthew Wolf-Meyer has a new book, an ethnography of sleep, The Slumbering Masses: Sleep, Medicine, and Modern American Life, that is amazing to read.

The favorite bit of wisdom I heard about sleep types was that some people are popcorn and others are flowers. Popcorn people POP! awake in the morning (often unbelievably early) and are sometimes already talking by the time their eyes are open. Their bodyminds are ready to work, think, write and they often go to it. As the day develops into the evening they slow down a bit, take things leisurely, and into the night many of them wilt (like popcorn in water) and tired slurred speech appears as they drift into bed.

Flower people are the opposite. Mornings see them embracing their pillows, dreams extend past their alarms, they ever so slowly open to the new day, like flowers; some of us are barely coherent until almost noon. As the day develops they get more and more awake, preferring to teach in the afternoon or even evening, and night is when they are actually, finally sharp, ready to talk fast, read deeply, write fluently. My most productive hours are 11pm to 4am. Skypeing then with European popcorns is a meeting of amazing intensity. I pop asleep too, transitioning from full alertness to out cold with almost no trace of tiredness. I save that for morning.

There are many other forms of chronotypes, and this nice article by Maria Popova is worth perusing when you’re up for it.

 

(there’s a bunch of other things i want to say but not now)

»Biomedicine as Culture

Biomedicine as Culture

Co-edited with Regula Burri in 2008. Biomedicine as Culture: Instrumental Practices, Technoscientific Knowledge, and New Modes of Life (Routledge Studies in Science, Technology and Society), best described through contents: Introduction REGULA VALÉRIE BURRI AND JOSEPH DUMIT PART I Social and cultural studies of biomedicine 1 Medicalizing culture(s) or culturalizing medicine(s) STEFAN BECK 2 Metaphors of medicine Continue reading…

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»Sitting, Academic Style

Skeleton At Computer 1

STS as Equipment for Literature: Sitzfleisch Material Semiosis (draft for 4S talk for panel, “Get your theories up and running with lively machines” – comments welcome) the title is a variation on rhetorician Kenneth Burke’s brilliant piece, “Literature as Equipment for Living,” describing the uses of inspirational and self-help books, noting that most people read Continue reading…

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»WRITING THE IMPLOSION: Teaching the World One Thing at a Time

implosion-lain

This has been my mainstay form of doing and thinking ethnographically a connected and disconnected world. A reading of Gilles Deleuze’s Cinema 2 in dialogue with Donna Haraway’s works and methods. Working through the former helps me unpack the process of Haraway’s inquisitive “implosion” method and some of its aims better. I describe this as Continue reading…

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