Massage

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We really don’t know what a body can do. Spinoza said this centuries ago and it is still true today. Writing a book about brain imaging I learned that we don’t even know how much of human life can be attributed to the brain (or genes). Training in massage therapy at the hands-on Davis Massage Therapy Institute, I learned that muscles, tendons, and fascia (all the other connective tissue in our bodies) are equally wild and mysterious, exceeding our imagination in their mobility, adaptability and plasticity. I also learned that I knew almost nothing about muscles and fascia, about pain and patterns, about care and treatments. Practicing for almost three years now I can say that there is an incredible variety of massage approaches and each can work wonders on people.

I began it partly to help my tennis-playing son whose 30 or so hours a week on the court put an inevitable and asymmetric strain on his body. Releasing tight muscles, teaching proper and surprising stretching and relaxing techniques, and emphasizing the importance of water for general body wellness were immediate results. My wife now practices a form of Chinese abdominal massage called Chi Nei Tsang, the belly being a place that many store their tension and stress, and also the site of stomach aches, intestinal disorders, and IBS. The main forms I practice are neuromuscular therapy and cranial-sacral, both fairly light in terms of pressure but deep in terms of effects. Working with tensions and reducing them can go a great way toward clearing up problems.

As part of training, we took a week-long cadaver dissection class for bodyworkers (taught by Gil Hedley – see his “fuzz” speech here). Exploring the intense variety of bodies at every scale with a group of people who spend their days working on bodies was incredible. Seeing what is beneath the skin and seeing how complicated and connected it is inspired me both to continue practicing massage and to find ways to represent anatomies in new ways. Currently I’m working with the KeckCAVES group to develop modes of comparing three-dimensional models and hopefully will be able to do this across the different anatomies that each tradition works with.

»5 Essential Tips for Getting a Grant

grants-money

These tips are aimed primarily at interdisciplinary researchers in the social sciences & humanities, but will hopefully be helpful for many others. They are based on years of sitting on grant panels, reading over a thousand grants, discussions and tips from colleagues about their experiences, and lots of presentations at STS camp and proposal writing Continue reading…

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»Biomedicine as Culture

Biomedicine as Culture

Co-edited with Regula Burri in 2008. Biomedicine as Culture: Instrumental Practices, Technoscientific Knowledge, and New Modes of Life (Routledge Studies in Science, Technology and Society), best described through contents: Introduction REGULA VALÉRIE BURRI AND JOSEPH DUMIT PART I Social and cultural studies of biomedicine 1 Medicalizing culture(s) or culturalizing medicine(s) STEFAN BECK 2 Metaphors of medicine Continue reading…

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»WRITING THE IMPLOSION: Teaching the World One Thing at a Time

implosion-lain

This has been my mainstay form of doing and thinking ethnographically a connected and disconnected world. A reading of Gilles Deleuze’s Cinema 2 in dialogue with Donna Haraway’s works and methods. Working through the former helps me unpack the process of Haraway’s inquisitive “implosion” method and some of its aims better. I describe this as Continue reading…

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