Booktivism! Great Books on Pharma!

Leonore Tiefer and a dedicated group of folks hosted a recent Selling Sickness conference. They also took the time to gather up a number of important books and make a Booktivism PDF that can be used as a reader’s guide and a bookgroup launching point – including orienting questions. Do check it out, it is a great model and includes Drugs for Life.

Anthropologists and Science & Technology Scholars have been exploring the drug industry as well. For instance, this syllabus by Stefan Ecks on the Anthropology of Pharmaceuticals (2011-12).

on Pharmaceutical Cultures, see the 2012 special issue of Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry written up here in Somatosphere. Also the special issue from 2006 with this editorial by Nate Greenslit and myself.

Check out these books:

Jeremy Greene, Prescribing by Numbers: Drugs and the Definition of Disease

Adriana Petryna, When Experiments Travel: Clinical Trials and the Global Search for Human Subjects

Petrya, Lakoff & Kleinman, Global Pharmaceuticals: Ethics, Markets, Practices

 

 

(this is terribly incomplete, but i need to edit it on something other than my ipad)

»How I Read

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Notes on reading modes sent to a grad class: I wanted to respond to the questions raised during our class regarding what kind of a reading I have been doing over these weeks.  I see it as close (as opposed to general), constructive (as opposed to deconstructive), positive (as opposed to negative), generous (as opposed Continue reading…

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»Objective Brains, Prejudicial Images

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Science in Context 12, 1 (1999), pp.173-201 In this article I argue that brain images constructed with computerized tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are part of a category of “expert images” and are both visually persuasive and also particularly difficult to interpret and understand by non-experts. Following the innovative judicial analogy of “demonstrative Continue reading…

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»Picturing Personhood: Brain Scans and Biomedical Identity

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By showing us the human brain at work, PET (positron emission tomography) scans are subtly–and sometimes not so subtly–transforming how we think about our minds. Picturing Personhood follows this remarkable and expensive technology from the laboratory into the world and back. It examines how PET scans are created and how they are being called on Continue reading…

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